Contact

mail@gemini-theme.com
+ 001 0231 123 32

Follow

Info

All demo content is for sample purposes only, intended to represent a live site. Please use the RocketLauncher to install an equivalent of the demo, all images will be replaced with sample images.

Monday of the Eleventh Week in Ordinary Time

Scripture Readings

Living a genuine Christian life, really taking the Gospel to heart, should be like living in a foreign land; it is difficult. It is a mix of trying to live the Gospel and trying to fit in. It's navigating the back and forth, the push and pull—the ongoing tension—of living with contradictions that is the challenge of discipleship.

Saturday of the Tenth Week in Ordinary Time

Scripture Readings

What drives us?  Do we want to be known for our great contributions?  Do we wish to acquire wealth and goods?  Does it bring us satisfaction to see people following our lead?  Maybe, we are driven by a competitive desire to be or do better than others.  Are we driven by the desire for pleasure and good feelings?  Maybe I nailed your answer and maybe I didn’t.  I asked the questions though because of the driving force that Paul offers us in the first reading.  He writes, “The love of Christ impels us.”  Can we reconcile these words to our lives?

Friday of the Tenth Week in Ordinary Time

Scripture Readings

Historically, people have often thought that having a disability or an illness meant that you were a sinner, or that some sort of evil had touched you. So, in some ages, the hearing loss I have would have been a sign that both my parents and I were sinful people – they, because they had a disabled child, and me because I couldn’t hear or speak quite normally. Even in today’s world, I think that we sometimes have that kind of attitude. For example, obesity is often seen evidence that a person lacks personal strength to eat the right kinds of foods, perceived as their personal shortcoming. This is the case even though we know there are some other causes for obesity and weight gain, including hormonal imbalances and side effects of certain medications. But beyond that, I know that I sometimes allow my disabilities to be a reason why I “can’t” do something. Disability is limiting and it can be hard to get the nerve (or energy) to do something (for me, that would be public speaking or going to a concert with my husband) because it’s easier not to fight to hear or move or see.

Memorial of Saint Anthony of Padua, Priest and Doctor of the Church

Scripture Readings

Today’s gospel passage (Matthew 5: 20-26) is pretty challenging as we read Jesus’ teachings to his disciples about anger.  They know the command/law “you shall not kill” and now Jesus adds to that, “But I say to you, whoever is angry with his brother will be liable to judgment….” He goes deeper into the heart where anger lies.  Jesus wants more from his disciples than simply obeying laws and commands.  He is challenging us to transform our hearts, our very lives.

Wednesday of the Tenth Week in Ordinary Time

Scripture Readings

Confidence. That’s a difficult thing to have sometimes. We live in uncertain times. We often lack consumer confidence, economic confidence, political confidence, self-confidence, confidence in relationships . . . Confidence. Do you feel confident in your relationship with God? Or do you worry sometimes that despite your best efforts you may not measure up and be found lacking? Are you confident of God’s love for you?

Memorial of Saint Barnabas, Apostle

Scripture Readings

“It was in Antioch that the disciples were first called Christians.”

Christians have done it again and again. Whether we are talking about hermits who retreated to the desert and later set up monastic communities devoted to praying the Psalms every day or we are talking about 16th-century reformers who rebelled against the practice of profiteering from the sale of indulgences or we are talking about the Jesus Movement in the 1960s that sought to reignite within white Evangelicalism a true devotion to Jesus, Christians return again and again to scripture to figure out how to live out an authentic faith in the present. Or, to put it another way, Christians are challenged to ask in each present within which they find themselves—what does it mean to be called . . . Christian. That is, what does it mean to be called. And what does it mean to be Christian.

Memorial of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Mother of the Church

Scripture Readings

Our parish is currently celebrating Mary (Discipleship- Magnifying the Lord). For many Catholics, Mary holds a very special place in their faith experience, while others struggle to understand exactly how Mary can enrich their faith in Jesus.  Our small discipleship group at the parish is currently reading “Jesus and the Jewish Roots of Mary” by Brant Pitre.  In this book, the author looks at the Old Testament to shed light on the New Testament.  Through the exploration of scripture and seeing patterns (or types), Mary’s role as mother and the “new Eve” may offer some insights in ways that we can find inspiration from Mary and her life.

Saturday of the Seventh Week of Easter

Scripture Readings

There is a priest in Erie, Pennsylvania named Fr. Larry Richards that describes himself as “loud, aggressive, and arrogant.”  It’s a flattering way to start a resume, I’m sure.  I’ve heard several of his talks and he can certainly be loud, but I also think he is good.  But why am I starting with this lakeside priest?  Because, in a conversation with some High School retreatants he captures the same thing that John presents us today in his gospel, and that Catechism of the Catholic Church offers us in paragraph 108.  They all capture this idea, Jesus Christ is both transcendent and immanent.  He is so near and yet bigger than we can ever handle.

Friday of the Seventh Week of Easter

Scripture Readings

So many people do not REALLY have faith in Christ or in his resurrection.  They see Jesus as a nice guy who said good things like "Love each other" but the idea that Jesus rose bodily from the dead seems both a figment of imagination as well as an unnecessary part of the gospel story.  Today's scriptures ask us to reconsider the significance of Jesus' bodily resurrection, though.

Thursday of the Seventh Week of Easter

Scripture Readings

Do you feel safe? It’s a complicated question.  In many of our workplaces, we hear slogans about safety being the number one priority.  After the recent Tornado outbreak, we may be wondering how safe our homes are property will be as climate change makes these kinds of storms worse and more common.  Sometimes we feel insecure or unsure about our relationships with friends, family, children, and spouse.  We may not feel financially secure.  And unfortunately, our faith is no guarantee that each of these concerns will not happen.  So, what is it are we praying for in today’s psalm?

Memorial of Saint Boniface, Bishop and Martyr

Scripture Readings

Liturgically, we find ourselves winding down the Easter season and preparing for Pentecost this weekend. In the rhythm of our calendar year, we find ourselves in graduation season. Many people are celebrating high school and college graduations with loved ones and preparing to send young people off to their next phase of life. Often these become tear-stained celebrations that involve good-bye’s and moving vans. The graduation ceremonies almost always include speeches given by select students and invited dignitaries, in which the graduates are exhorted to embrace their future with zeal, courage, and vigor, and to consider the legacy they wish to leave. These speeches are a commissioning of sorts – a sending forth with motivating words to guide them in their future endeavors.

Tuesday of the Seventh Week of Easter

Scripture Readings

The scene that we encounter in the reading from John today is quite striking. Jesus raises his eyes to heaven and begins to speak. He is praying to God. He is not talking to the apostles or teaching them how to pray. He’s talking to God, the Father, as he puts it. This is an extraordinary gift to us—a rare and intimate glimpse into a communication between Jesus and God. In his prayer, Jesus remembers what God called him to do and how he answered that call all the days of his earthly life. He reports that his teaching has had powerful effects. The Logos was not just heard but taken (like the Eucharist) into people’s minds and bodies and made into their flesh and soul. Thus, he tells the Father, they belong to God now. God called Jesus to this work, and he has done it. As he anticipates his passion he knows that he has done what God asked.

Memorial of Saint Charles Lwanga and Companions, Martyrs

Scripture Readings

Today is the Memorial of Saint Charles Lwanga and Companions, the Ugandan martyrs canonized by Pope Paul VI. All 22 of these saints were young men between the ages of 13 and 30 when they were brutally murdered in 1886 by the Bugandan king for adhering to their Christian morality. The elements of good and evil, purity and depravity are clear and easily identified in the story of their persecution. Even while our own stories are less dramatic, we find ourselves deeply inspired by their faith and courage---because they stayed with Jesus.

Memorial of Saint Justin, Martyr

Scripture Readings

“After [Paul’s] arrival he gave great assistance to those who had come to believe through grace.  He vigorously refuted the Jews in public, establishing from the Scriptures that the Christ is Jesus” (Acts 18:27b-28).  Those are the closing words of our first reading today.  It captures nicely what this whole section of Acts is all about.  Paul, invigorated by the Holy Spirit, is supporting, nurturing, growing, and defending the primitive church and the disciples it is composed of.  And why do this?  Why does he face persecution, arrest, and beatings?  Why does he stand for people he has never met, even former gentiles?  Why does he stand against his own people?  It really is a tense question. 

Feast of the Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Scripture Readings

For many of us, we start our day with a morning ritual that likely includes breakfast, cleaning up prayer, making lunch or lunches and then out the door.  Sometimes while we are rushing around we get distracted thinking about how the day is going to unfold.  This often happens to me in the midst of prayer.  Usually by the time I have hit the door at work my persona changes.  Perhaps this happens for all of us, we need to be different people at work.  The transition for me is that my heart moves into visitation mode.  It is a blessing that the day is spent visiting others and allowing the Lord to visit me through the people I meet.

Thursday of the Sixth Week of Easter

Scripture Readings

In our gospel acclamation today we hear - “I will not leave you orphans says the Lord. I will come back to you and your hearts will rejoice.” (Jn. 14:18). What a beautiful promise from the Lord - he will not leave us as orphans.

Wednesday of the Sixth Week of Easter

Scripture Readings

As you enter into prayer with these readings, I encourage you to read Acts 17:16-21, also. I think those verses provide important context to the assigned passage. We find St Paul proclaiming the Gospel in Athens to a very tough audience. At that time, Athens was alive in its heyday as a center for philosophical thought, and a metropolis filled with idols, temples, and statues to the pantheon of Greek gods that people worshipped and consulted for guidance in their daily lives. The philosophers passed their time in the marketplace and on city streets debating with one another and listening to the ideas of the respected teachers.

Tuesday of the Sixth Week of Easter

Scripture Readings

Today’s readings are pretty intense for significantly different reasons.  On one hand, there is the persecution, imprisonment, and liberation of Paul and Silas.  On the other hand, there is Christ’s departure and assurance to his disciples.  Both attest to the power and presence of God in times of trouble and uncertainty.

Monday of the Sixth Week of Easter

Scripture Readings

Today’s first reading from Acts has particular significance for me, since I visited the site where St. Paul met Lydia while on pilgrimage last November.  We celebrated Mass on the banks of the small stream that is described in the reading.  As I reflect on the scripture today, there are insights that further my understanding of how God works not just back in the early church, but even now in 2019.

Saturday of the Fifth Week of Easter

Scripture Readings

Jesus’ words in today’s Gospel immediately brought to mind the idea of an ambassador or an emissary.  Here are the verses that I want to reflect upon, “If the world hates you, realize that it hated me first.  If you belonged to the world, the world would love its own; but because you do not belong to the world, and I have chosen you out of the world, the world hates you.  …  If they persecuted me, they will also persecute you.  If they kept my word, they will also keep yours.  And they will do all these things to you on account of my name…”  I know, it is a charming little passage.  To offer a juvenile side note, this passage is a perfect set up for Jesus to look at us when we complain and say, “I told you so.”