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Saturday of the Fourth Week in Ordinary Time

Scripture Readings

A line from today's first reading from Hebrews struck me today.  It reads, "Do not neglect to do good and to share what you have God is pleased by sacrifices of that kind” (Heb. 13:16 NAB).  This seems pretty simple, right?  Any basic catechesis we received will tell us that sins of omission, failing to do something, are real.  We even say it when we recite the Confeitor with these words, “I confess to almighty God and to you, my brothers and sisters, that I have greatly sinned, … in what I have failed to do.”  So we are certainly supposed to do good and we are supposed to share.  Hebrews tells us to share what we have and that is where we should spend some time today.

Friday of the Fourth Week in Ordinary Time

Scripture Readings

Today's readings are starkly different from each other.  The first reading (Hebrews 13:1-8) gives advice to Christians on how to live as though Jesus really matters. The list should be familiar to us: love, hospitality, keeping the prisoners and other outcasts in mind, treating your spouse well, avoid falling too much in love with money and desire for things. 

Thursday of the Fourth Week in Ordinary Time

Scripture Readings 

Upon first reading of today’s gospel passage (Mark 6: 7-13), one might reflect on how we, as Jesus’ disciples, are also called, like the first Twelve, to go out into the world to preach the Good News and heal those in need of healing.  And this is true, at least in our own way, in our own walk of life.  Today, however, I would like to reflect on how sometimes we are the ones in need of hearing Jesus’ words, and the ones in need of healing.  In Mark’s gospel Jesus instructs the disciples to stay in a house that welcomes them until they are ready to leave that area, and to “leave there and shake the dust off your feet in testimony again them” in whatever place does not welcome the disciples or listen to them.

Memorial of Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton, Religious

Scripture Readings

The first reading at first seems a contradiction.  We know that we are all sinners.  Yet it says that anyone who does righteous deeds is righteous, and anyone who sins is a child of the devil.  Here on Earth we sadly have our feet in both worlds; we’re all “a little bit bad and a little bit good.”  From my Baptism, I have been in the family of God, a son of God and a brother of Jesus.  But certainly I have sinned since my Baptism!  So what is John trying to say here?

Christmas Weekday

Scripture Readings

Saint John’s letters and gospel are more philosophical than St. Paul’s letters and the other three gospels.  It’s helpful to keep this in mind diving into today’s Word.  From where we stand in 21st century western culture, it can be confusing when John’s letter simultaneously says anyone who acts with righteousness is begotten by God, AND that no one who sins has seen the Lord.  Aren’t we begotten by God in our Baptism?  And yet we all continue to sin.  What’s happening here?

Memorial of Saints Basil the Great and Gregory Nazianzen, Bishops and Doctors of the Church

Scripture Readings

Today is the feast day for two theologians, Basil the Great and Gregory of Nazianzus.  The two were friends, along with Basil’s brother Gregory of Nyssa (whose feast day we observe on March 9th).  These are saints that are more familiar to our Eastern Orthodox brothers and sisters, but they are very important for both Eastern and Western Christianity.  Saints Basil and Gregory are particularly remembered for the ways they helped develop Trinitarian doctrine so that we could understand it better.

The Octave Day of Christmas
Solemnity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Mother of God

Scripture Readings

New Year’s Eve has always seemed to be a holiday I observed much more than I fully participated in. If I watched the ball drop on TV or attended a party, I could certainly witness the excitement lots of people seemed to experience when the movement from one moment to the next also signified the move from one year to the next. I just never could get all that enthused.

The Seventh Day in the Octave of Christmas

Scripture Readings

Here we are again at the end of another year. What resolutions have we been pondering?

Feast of the Holy Family of Jesus, Mary and Joseph

Scripture Readings

Instead of a typical homily, today, I felt led to pray for families. Over the year, I get numerous requests from parishioners to pray for various needs of families. Today, it is my intention to bring these needs before the entire community, so that together we can raise these needs up to God in prayer. 

The Fifth Day in the Octave of Christmas

Scripture Readings

On this fifth day in the octave of Christmas, we reflect upon the Presentation of Jesus in the Temple. Simeon was regarded as a holy man among the people of Israel and was blessed with the promise of seeing the Messiah. Joseph and Mary prove themselves to be good Jews also by bringing Jesus up to Jerusalem for His presentation.

Feast of the Holy Innocents, martyrs

Scripture Readings 

The Feast of the Nativity symbolizes the innocence of the incarnation as we celebrate the coming of Emmanuel.   The powerful God of creation sent his only son to be a vulnerable child to dwell among us.  Never mind what the infant mortality rate was two thousand years ago.  Never mind that they did not have cars, heating or air conditioning.  Never mind that there was no electricity, prenatal care, or birthing centers with sterile and somewhat comfortable birthing conditions.  Jesus’ birth was at a disadvantage for all these reasons and one more.  Today’s gospel reminds us that he was hated for who he was almost from the time of his birth.  Yet, into this world, Christ was sent to bear witness to a loving God who wants to be one with us.

Feast of Saint Stephen, first martyr

Scripture Readings

Here we are, the day after Christmas.  This is a time for joy, cheer, good company, and martyrdom.  Yup, the day after celebrating the nativity of adorable little baby Jesus we have the feast of St. Stephen, the first martyr (makes sense why Good King Wenceslaus is a Christmas carol now).  This begs the question, “What’s the deal Church?  Why celebrate the feast of the first Christian martyr the day after Christmas?  Can’t we just get a couple days of cute baby action?”  Obviously the answer is no, but I want to spend our reflection this morning exploring why the Church might celebrate the feast of Stephen the day after Christmas.

The Nativity of the Lord – Christmas

Scripture Readings

It was the Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe. I was walking to the back of the church for the entrance procession for our school Mass. A kindergartner waived to me and said, “Hi, Jesus!” I waved back as I smiled. In my mind I said, “Girl, you are killing me!” Think about it, though. There was a time when a little child could wave and another human person and say, “Hi Jesus!” There was a time when Jesus walked as a human person and a blind man cried out, “Jesus, Son of David! Have pity on me!” There was a day, when the disciples looked at a human person and said, “You are the Christ, the Son of the Living God”! There was also that fateful day, when a Roman Centurion looked up to a human person nailed to a cross, and exclaimed, “Truly, this was the Son of God!” (Mt 27:54). Christmas is the day on which humans look at a baby lying in a manger in a stable and said, “Hi, Jesus!” 

Monday in Fourth Week of Advent - Mass in the Morning

Scripture Readings

I watch my grandkids on a regular basis.  Almost every time my 2 year old granddaughter comes over, she looks at me and says, “Nana, I came here!”  In her simple language, she is telling me that she left her home and traveled to my house to be with me.  As I reflected on the readings and the imminent arrival of Christmas, I think that Jesus is reminding us of same- “I came here!”  Jesus has come down from heaven to be present in our lives!  Emmanuel- God with us!

Fourth Sunday of Advent

Scripture Readings

“Blessed are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb.” These were Elizabeth’s words to Mary. Two days before Christmas, are there better words to reflect upon? Mary’s role in the history of salvation can never be overestimated. Even though Joseph is not part of today’s gospel reading, I would like to bring him into the picture. In my three points, I would like to reflect on both of them.

Saturday of the Third Week of Advent

Scripture Readings

Today’s readings include the genealogy from Matthew.  A few years ago I would have likely skipped it entirely.  Maybe, just maybe, I would have skimmed it.  My assumption would have been something like this, “Here are some Old Testament greats to help set up why Jesus is so great.”  In those few years I’ve become more familiar with Scripture and have realized how wrong that assumption would be.

Friday of the Third Week of Advent

Scripture Readings

My daughter's been begging me to read a lot of stories about Jesus lately.  These aren't scriptural stories.  They're fictional stories, but each one of them is telling something true about who God is for us. There's one about a clown, for example, who juggles; everyone laughs at him, but Jesus does not.  In fact, in the story, Jesus delights in this juggler who juggles with all his might.  Or, there's a story about a little mouse who plays a little acorn drum for the baby Jesus.  In this story, the little mouse is looked down upon by his other animal friends, because he is so tiny, but it turns out that he and his joyful playing of a drum end up being the  most captivating for Jesus.  

Thursday of the Third Week of Advent

Scripture Readings

God wants us to know he’s “for real.”  He’s serious.  He loves us and wants to be a transformative part of our lives.  As proof in today’s first reading, he says to Ahaz, ‘Ask for a sign!  Whatever you can think of, I’ll show you!’  But Ahaz doesn’t want to believe.  There are times when we don’t want to believe either.  When God calls us to do something challenging and promises to be with us through the difficulty, we sometimes would rather avoid the challenge altogether.  Perhaps we don’t want to ‘jump’ to find out if God will ‘catch us.’  Perhaps we believe God’s call in our life was once and done.  Perhaps we are just comfortable with how things are today; whether life is good or bad, at least we know how to deal with it.  For whatever reason, Ahaz simply didn’t want to hear God’s call. 

Wednesday of the Third Week of Advent

Scripture Readings

Imagine if your life was coming to an end, what might you want to say to those whom you love?  In the readings today remind us of the breadth of salvation history. Jacob, whom God has renamed Israel is dying.  He calls his sons together and tells them that Judah will be the number one son after he is gone. Indeed Jacob says, “You, Judah, your brothers shall praise”. This is a play on words as Judah means “you shall be praised”, however it alludes to the prominent role which the tribe of Judah will play. In Judah is found Jerusalem and from Judah arises King David, through whose lineage Jesus comes to us.